National Security: Farewell Sky King

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In the military section of the Treasures of Madison County Museum is a group photograph around an F-4D Phantom II.  The picture was taken in May 1972 at DaNang Air Base, South Vietnam.  About twenty members of the 35th Tactical Fighter Squadron “Panthers” are included in the photo including yours truly.  In the cockpit of the jet is the squadron commander, Lt. Col. Lyle L. Beckers.
Lyle recently died at the age of 81 in Gainesville, Georgia from the effects of Alzheimer’s.  Four decades ago, we knew him by his moniker “Sky King” as a fearless fighter pilot leader.  Where did that name come from?  Some of you might recall the children’s television adventure Sky King from the 1950s.
I served under a variety of fighter squadron commanders in Korea, Vietnam, England and Germany, as well as a couple stateside. Some were better than others, but as a whole, they were fine leaders and taught me a great deal.  Lyle Beckers stands out though.  He was a highly experienced fighter pilot in both the F-100 Super Sabre as well as the F-4 Phantom.  He was also a graduate of the Fighter Weapons School, literally graduate school for “jet jockeys.”
I arrived at Kunsan Air Base, South Korea in mid-March 1972 for my first duty assignment out of flight training.  I spent the next couple of weeks in-processing, and before I knew which way was up, my squadron was sent south to the war in Southeast Asia.  What prompted this sudden change of course was the North Vietnamese had launched their Easter Offensive on March 29 with 200 thousand invading troops.  The only way to halt this invasion was with air power.  We were the first outside unit to respond; many more would follow.
Initially, our people and jets were split between two bases, DaNang in South Vietnam and Ubon in Thailand.  We filled in to replace combat losses but before long, the squadron was reunited at DaNang under our own flag.  The two lieutenant colonels in the 35th were the commander, Lyle Beckers, and operations officer Bill Mickelson.  They were both experienced fighter pilots with previous combat tours and complimented each other well. Beckers was the leader while Mickelson was the ‘people person.’
Lyle Beckers led the toughest missions.  In mid-May, Operation Linebacker began and we regularly flew high risk missions into the industrial heartland of North Vietnam.  I can never recall a Linebacker mission where Beckers was not the flight lead of our first 4-ship.  He led from the front.  Frequently, I was on his wing in another jet, usually the number four aircraft. His decision making was precise and flawless.
Do you recall a couple of years ago when some official in the Obama Administration said that the United States was leading the coalition against Libya “from behind?”  Lyle Beckers wouldn’t understand that; it wouldn’t compute.  A leader is in front and never asks his troops to do anything he isn’t willing to do himself.  That was Lyle Beckers’ style of leadership and we all looked up to him.
Most of our missions into North Vietnam were air-to-air missions meaning we were there to protect the strike flights from MiG attacks.  On May 23rd, Beckers was leading our squadron when the flight was jumped by MiGs.  He used an AIM-7 Sparrow missile to shoot down a MiG-19.  The number 3 aircraft shot down a MiG-21 with the 20mm canon.  Number 2 registered a probable kill with an AIM-9 Sidewinder missile.  Altogether, a very successful mission.
Three months later in September, Beckers registered his second MiG kill, this time against a MiG-21 using an AIM-9 and the gun.  MiG kills in the Vietnam War were infrequent and hard to come by.  Only a handful of pilots registered more than one kill.  Lyle Beckers was one of the few who did.
Colonel Beckers was an imposing fellow, probably taller than 6’1”, and he was possessed with all-American looks.  It pains me to think of a strong leader felled by Alzheimer’s, but he is well now and at peace.  Let us pray: “Father of all, we pray to you for Lyle, and for all those whom we love but see no longer.  Grant to them eternal rest.  Let light perpetual shine upon them.  May his soul and the souls of all the departed, through the mercy of God, rest in peace.  Amen.”
If you want to read and see more about the Panthers and our boss Lyle Beckers, I invite you to visit the website of my good friend, Rick Keyt at keytlaw.com/f-4/. You might take time to read “The Tale of Gator 3” where Colonel Beckers was the flight lead.
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Joe Boyles

Written by Joe Boyles