Madison County Teachers Rated Effective By State

Overall, the state considers the job performance of Madison County School District’s instructional and non-instruction personnel to be either highly effective or effective.
This according to the preliminary results of the 2013-14 district personnel evaluations released late last week by the Florida Department of Education (FDOE).
The data show that 37.4 percent of Madison County classroom teachers were rated highly effective, 59.2 percent were rated effective, and 0.7 percent was rated unsatisfactory.
Out of a total of 221 classroom teachers, 74, or 33.5 percent, were not evaluated.
In terms of the school district’s non-instructional personnel, 57.1 percent were rated highly effective and 42.9 percent were rated effective. None were listed in the needing improvement or unsatisfactory categories.
Out of a total of 28 non-instructional personnel, seven, or 25 percent, were not evaluated, according to the FDOE.
Madison County administrators were nearly all rated effective. Only one out of 11 administrators, or 9.1 percent, was not evaluated, according to the FDOE.
In terms of the individual schools, and counting all instructional staff for each school:
* Greenville Elementary School — 14.3 percent were rated highly effective, 78.6 percent were rated effective, and 7.1 percent were rated unsatisfactory. Out of 21 instructional staff, seven, or 33.3 percent, were not evaluated.
* Lee Elementary School — 80 percent were rated highly effective and 20 percent were rated effective. None were rated as needing improvement or unsatisfactory. Out of 18 instructional staff, three, or 16.7 percent, were not evaluated.
* Madison County Central School — 40.0 percent were rated highly effective and 60 percent were rated effective. None were rated as needing improvement or unsatisfactory. Out of 107 instructional staff, 27, or 25.2 percent, were not evaluated.
 *Madison County High School — 25.0 percent were rated highly effective and 65.0 percent were rated effective. None were rated as needing improvement or unsatisfactory. Out of 52 instructional staff, 12, or 23.1 percent, were not evaluated.
* Pinetta Elementary School — 58.3 percent were rated highly effective and 41.7 percent were rated effective. None were rated as needing improvement or unsatisfactory. Out of 15 instructional staff, three, or 20 percent, were not evaluated.
Statewide, approximately 42 percent of classroom teachers were rated highly effective and 55 percent were rated effective, according to the FDOE data. Only 0.3 percent were rated unsatisfactory statewide.
Education Commissioner Pam Stewart called the evaluations one of the many tools at the department’s disposal to analyze teacher performance.
“I’m proud that the majority of our teachers scored so well,” said Stewart. “There’s no doubt that some of our school districts still need improvement and we should not have any failing schools. This is why we’re continuing to examine many factors that affect student outcomes, including our assessments.”
According to FDOE, evaluation results are assigned by districts to teachers, non-classroom personnel and school administrators, based on each district’s approved evaluation system.
“During the first week of August, the FDOE provided each school district with student growth results,” the FDOE release stated. “The districts then applied locally established cut points, which were combined with Instructional Practice Score data, and incorporated student learning growth data from local assessments where appropriate, resulting in each individual’s annul evaluation.”
Known as the value-added model (VAM), the state’s evaluation system is based on a number of factors that include students’ standardized test scores and classroom evaluations, with the teachers’ VAM scores having the potential to result in salary increases or terminations.
In the past, the Florida Education Association (FEA) has criticized the use of the VAM, calling the FDOE’s practice of publicly releasing the preliminary results “yet another blow to hardworking teachers.”
The FDOE will have an updated version of the report in January, once the state’s 74 districts provide more complete data. Comprising the 74 districts are the state’s 67 counties (one district per county), the four research schools (each one a district), and the school for the deaf and blind, the virtual school, and the youth development center — each a district in itself.
 The preliminary report on 2013-14 personnel evaluations can be found online at http://www.fldoe.org/teaching/performance-evaluation.
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