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Madison Countians wounded, captured, and killed at Gettysburg

Jacob Bembry: Greene Publishing, Inc.

“Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.  Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived, and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of it, as a final resting place for those who died here, that the nation might live. This we may, in all propriety do. But, in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate — we cannot consecrate — we cannot hallow, this ground — The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have hallowed it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here; while it can never forget what they did here. It is rather for us, the living, we here be dedicated to the great task remaining before us — that, from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here, gave the last full measure of devotion — that we here highly resolve these dead shall not have died in vain; that the nation, shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people by the people for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

The words of Abraham Lincoln still ring out during struggles for freedom. The Republican president, who died much too young from an assassin’s bullet, has this speech quoted today by school children and politicians alike. It is imprinted on the pages of school books, showing us a sad time in American history as brother fought against brother as both sides thought they were right. Lincoln said in the speech “the world will little note, nor long remember what we say here; while it can never forget what they did here.” President Lincoln was wrong because his words still are remembered today, but he is right that we cannot forget what the opposing forces of North and South, Union and Confederacy, did on that awful, bloodied battlefield the first three days of July, 1863. What may be forgotten, on the yellowing pages of history, however, are the names of the men who gave their lives and were wounded and captured in the battle.

There were Madison Countians who fought at Gettysburg, including some who were killed, wounded and captured.

Thomas M. Calhoun suffered a gunshot wound in his right arm on July 2, 1863 and was captured on July 4, 1863, the same day he was admitted to the US XII Corps hospital. Calhoun was then sent to DeCamp Hospital in New York Harbor. He was paroled on August 24, 1863 and sent to the General Hospital in Petersburg, Va., on September 5, 1863. After spending fifty days in Petersburg, he never returned to his regiment. Calhoun had enlisted in the Confederate Army on May 8, 1862 in Madison and he took the oath of allegiance to the United States, after the war, in Madison on May 18, 1865. Married to the former Clarissa Cottingham on October 17, 1888, he died in Madison County on May 28, 1899.

William Cason was wounded on the final day of the Battle of Gettysburg on July 3, 1863. Afterward, he was admitted to West’s Buildings Hospital in Baltimore, Md., on July 31, 1863. He was paroled from there on August 22, 1863, and sent to the General Hospital in Petersburg, Va., where he was released on September 6, 1863. Cason had enlisted in the Confederate Army on March 9, 1863 in Madison. On August 1, 1864, he deserted to the Union Army and took the oath of allegiance to the United States at the time of his desertion.

George Frank Cubbedge was wounded on July 3, 1863 at Gettysburg and captured the following day. Present at Camp Letterman on August 10, 1863, he was admitted to West’s Buildings Hospital in Baltimore on August 11, 1863. He was exchanged from Point Lookout on February 10, 1865. Cubbedge had been born in Madison in 1846. He was 5’8” tall and had a fair complexion, with dark hair and hazel eyes. He had enlisted in the Confederate Army at the age of 15 or 16 on February 26, 1862 in Madison. He pledged the oath of allegiance to the United States in Madison on May 14, 1865. He passed away on May 21, 1894. His grave can be found in Evergreen Cemetery in Jacksonville.

Boaz Whitfield Moseley, who served as Madison’s town marshal in 1860, was shot in the head at Gettysburg on July 3, 1863. On July 4, 1863, he was admitted to the U.S. Corps XII Hospital at Gettysburg before being sent to West’s Buildings Hospital in Baltimore, Md. Moseley had been born in 1835 in Lenoir County, N.C., and had lived in Jefferson County with his 69-year-old father, Joshua, and two siblings, Algernon (who was 23) and 18-year-old Elizabeth, and two other people, 34-year-old Alexander Aldridge and 17-year-old Winnie Whitfield, before becoming town marshal of Madison. While town marshal, he lived in a hotel owned by J.H. Barker and J.W. Holleman. According to the slave schedules, Moseley owned 10 slaves in two houses, including two 26-year-olds, two 21-year-olds, an 8-year-old, a 6-year-old, a 4-year-old, a 3-year-old, a 1-year-old, and a 3-month-old. He enlisted in the Confederate Army on February 26, 1862 at the Pensacola and Georgia Railroad. He transferred to the Invalid Corps on December 17, 1864. He apparently died from his head wounds a year after the war ended.

William C. Bryan was captured at Gettysburg on July 2, 1863. He was released prior to August 23, 1863. Bryan had enlisted in Madison on February 26, 1862 and he was among those who surrendered with Gen. Robert E. Lee at Appomattox Court House, Va., on April 9, 1865.

Richard E. Cash was also captured on July 2, 1863 at the Battle of Gettysburg. Cash was born on December 22, 1839. He stood 5’8” inches tall, had a dark complexion, grey eyes, and dark hair. He enlisted in the Confederate Army on April 26, 1862 in Madison. After the war, he took the oath of allegiance to the United States at Fort Lauderdale. In August 1865, he married the former Georgia Roscoe and they resided in Boston, Ga., with their two daughters, Lillie and Emma. Cash was employed as a farm worker. He died on Christmas Day in 1888 in Madison County. He was buried in Macedonia Baptist Church Cemetery near Lee.

Arthur A. Brown was mortally wounded and captured on July 2, 1863 at the Battle of Gettysburg. He had his leg amputated. He died of the wounds he sustained on July 14, 1863. His personal belongings, including $94.62, were given to his father. Brown was born in 1846 and enlisted in the Confederate Army in Madison on March 26, 1862. He was 5’6” tall, had a fair complexion, blue eyes, and light hair.

Captain John Scott Cochran died on November 28, 1863 after he was shot in the upper part of the left shoulder and lung and captured on July 2, 1863 at Gettysburg. He was sent to Camp Letterman on August 7, 1863 where he stayed for 10 days before being sent to West’s Buildings Hospital where he later died. He was buried in Grave A-43 of Loudon Park Cemetery in Baltimore, Md., on November 29, 1863.  He enlisted as a 3rd Lieutenant of Company D of his regiment on March 26, 1862 in Madison. He was also wounded and captured at Sharpsburg, Md., on September 17, 1862. He was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant on October 1, 1862, 1st Lieutenant on November 29, 1862, and Captain on January 1, 1863. At the time of his enlistment, he was a wagoner in Madison, where he resided with his 60-year-old father, A.J.; his 55-year-old mother, Pam; and six siblings: 30-year-old H.A.; 25-year-old C.C.; 25-year-old A.C.; 21-year-old A.P.; 16-year-old Martha; and 13-year-old Caroline.

Richard Dewey, a 3rd Corporal, was reported missing on July 2, 1863. There is no further record of him and he was presumed killed. Dewey was born in 1845 and enlisted as a corporal on March 26, 1862 in Madison.

James N. Jarvis was born in 1844 and enlisted in the Confederate Army on March 26, 1862 in Madison. He was killed July 2, 1863 at Gettysburg.

Thomas Patterson was reported missing on July 2, 1863, and was never found. It is believed he was killed on the second day of fighting at Gettysburg. Born in 1846, he enlisted in the Confederate Army on April 1, 1862 in Madison.

Edward Edwards was reported missing on July 2, 1863 on his company’s muster roll. He was listed as captured on either July 2 or 5, 1863 in Federal prison records. Edwards was born in 1831 and enlisted in the Confederate Army on March 27, 1862 in Madison.  The 5’9” tall Edwards had a light complexion, blue eyes, and dark hair.

Andrew Jackson Jarvis was captured at the Battle of Gettysburg on July 2, 1863. Born April 16, 1835 in South Carolina, Jarvis joined the Confederate Army on March 26, 1862 in Madison.

James Hamilton Wentworth was a Brevet 2nd Lieutenant. He was born in 1836 and was a school teacher in Madison, where he lived with his wife, Elizabeth. He enlisted in the Confederate Army in Madison on November 29, 1862. In the 1880 census, he was listed as a merchant in Taylor County and had married another woman named Nancy Jane and had 10 children. He died December 8, 1893 and is buried in St. John’s Cemetery there.

Levi H. Calhoun was killed July 2, 1863 at the Battle of Gettysburg. His personal effects, consisting of $95.02, were given to his attorney, J.W. Anderson. Calhoun enlisted as a private in Madison on August 1, 1862. The fair skinned Calhoun stood 5’11” tall, and had grey eyes and light hair.

Edward J. Hudson was killed July 2, 1863, during the second day of fighting at the Battle of Gettysburg. His attorney, J.W. Anderson, collected his personal effects, which consisted of $78.89. Hudson was born in 1837 in Madison County and was married at the time of his enlistment, which took place May 8, 1862 in Madison. Hudson stood 5’10” tall and had a fair complexion, grey eyes, and light hair. He is buried in Greenhill Cemetery in Martinsburg, W.V.

1st Lieutenant John A. Jenkins was killed July 2, 1863 at Gettysburg. J.W. Anderson, Jenkins’ attorney collected his effects, which consisted of $96 in cash. He was born in 1827 and was married when he enlisted in the Confederate Army on February 26, 1862 in Madison.

Josiah Jones was killed July 2, 1863 at Gettysburg. He enlisted in the Confederate Army on May 8, 1862 at Madison.

Samuel H. Williams was wounded and captured on July 2, 1863 during fighting at Gettysburg. There are no further records of him so it is believed he was killed. He enlisted on May 8, 1862 in Madison.

Lewis H. Worthington was killed on July 3, 1863 at Gettysburg. His personal effects, consisting of $111.02, were given to his widow, C.H. He enlisted as a private on April 26, 1862 in Madison.

John W. Johnson was wounded July 2, 1863 at Gettysburg. He was improving in the hospital at Staunton, Va., and was returned to his company before their September/October 1863 muster. Johnson was born in 1838 and stood 6’ tall and had a dark complexion, grey eyes, and dark hair. He died July 22, 1890 in Madison County.

Parris D. Arnold had been missing since the Battle of Gettysburg and it was reported on his company’s muster roll on August 13, 1863. It was later discovered he had been admitted to Decamp Hospital at New York Harbor, where he was paroled. The Madison resident was 5’9” tall, had a fair complexion, with blue eyes and dark hair. He enlisted March 8, 1862 in Madison.

Samuel Boyd Flynn was captured July 4, 1863. He enlisted February 26, 1862 in Madison. He died January 22, 1897 and is buried in the Old City Cemetery in Jacksonville in Section 3, Lot 33, Grave #7.

Shadrick J. Hicks was captured July 2, 1863 during the Battle of Gettysburg. He died of chronic diarrhea on September 12, 1863 at Fort Delaware. He was buried on Finn’s Point, N.J., across the Delaware River from the fort. He enlisted in the Confederate Army on May 8, 1862 in Madison.

Source for information: Confederate Casualties at Gettysburg: A Comprehensive Record, by John W. Busey and Travis W. Busey, Published by McFarland & Company, Inc., Jefferson, N.C., Copyright 2017.

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