Keeping tabs on congressional lawmakers

The issue that Congress addressed in recent weeks was Sanctuary Cities, Cybersecurity, Budget Agreement and Debt Limit, Debt Prevention, Scholarship Program, National Strategic and Critical Minerals Production and Health Care. Following are the corresponding votes from Senators Bill Nelson, Senator Marco Rubio and House Representative Gwen Graham, of the 2nd Congressional District and Congressman Ted Yoho, of the 3rd Congressional District.

In the Senate:
"Sanctuary Cities" – With a vote of 54-45 and one not voting, the Senate rejected a motion to invoke cloture on the McConnell, R-Ky., motion to proceed to the bill that would withhold federal funds from cities and jurisdictions that do not comply with certain federal immigration laws. The measure would also set sentencing requirements for individuals who repeatedly re-enter the United States illegally after deportation. Nelson voted no. Rubio voted yes.
Cybersecurity Information Sharing – With a vote of 74-21 and five not voting, the Senate passed a measure that would direct the federal government to develop procedures to facilitate information sharing, and it would authorize the voluntary sharing and receipt of a cybersecurity threat and operation of defensive measures by private entities. Nelson voted yes. Rubio voted not voting.
Budget Agreement and Debt Limit – With a vote of 64-35 and one not voting, the Senate cleared legislation which suspends the debt limit until March 15, 2017, and it partially rolls back the sequester of discretionary spending scheduled for fiscal 2016 and fiscal 2017 to increase caps for those two years by a total of $80 billion, split equally between defense and non-defense. It requires additional funding through the war-related Overseas Contingency Operations account for both years, as well. It also prevents a sharp increase in Medicare Part B premiums for certain beneficiaries in 2016 and keeps the Social Security disability insurance trust fund solvent until 2022. It includes $79.9 billion in mandatory spending cuts and revenue increases to offset the bill's costs, and would reduce the deficit by $497 million according to the Congressional Budget Office. Nelson voted yes. Rubio voted no.

In the House:
Debt Prevention – With a vote of 235-194 and five not voting, the House passed legislation that allows the Treasury Department, once the statutory debt limit is reached, to continue borrowing above that limit in order to pay the principal and interest on both government debt held by the public as it comes due and on obligations held by the Social Security trust fund. Yoho voted yes. Graham voted no.
District of Columbia Opportunity Scholarship Program Reauthorization – With a vote of 240-191 and three not voting, the House passed a bill that reauthorizes the Scholarships for Opportunity and Results program for five years, through fiscal 2021. It is a federally funded program under which eligible students in Washington, D.C., can receive vouchers to attend private schools and is the nation's only federally funded private school voucher program. Yoho voted yes. Graham voted no.
National Strategic and Critical Minerals Production – With a vote of 254-177 and three not voting, the House passed legislation that reclassifies certain mining operations as "infrastructure projects" in order to allow the permitting for mining on federal lands to be conducted under a streamlined permitting process created for infrastructure projects by a 2012 presidential order. Yoho voted yes. Graham voted no.
Health Care Reconciliation – With a vote of 240-189 with five not voting, the House passed a bill that repeals key elements of the 2010 health care overhaul law including the individual and employer mandates and the medical device and "Cadillac" taxes, and it blocks for one year federal funding for Planned Parenthood. Yoho voted yes. Graham voted no.
Retail Investor Protection – With a vote of 245-186 with three not voting, the House passed a bill that prohibits the Labor Department from implementing a final rule on fiduciary standards for retirement investment advisers until after the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) conducts a study and issues a final rule setting standard of conduct for broker-dealers. Yoho voted yes. Graham voted no.
Export-Import Bank Reauthorization – With a vote of 313-118 and three not voting, the chamber moved a measure that reauthorizes the official export credit agency of the United States for four years; sets new, lower, lending caps; aims to increase accountability and transparency at the bank; and directs the president to initiate negotiations to reduce and eventually eliminate government export subsidies worldwide. Yoho voted no. Graham voted yes.
Budget Agreement and Debt Limit – With a vote of 266-167 and two not voting, the House agreed to legislation which suspends the debt limit until March 15, 2017, and it partially rolls back the sequester of discretionary spending scheduled for fiscal 2016 and fiscal 2017 to increase caps for those two years by a total of $80 billion, split equally between defense and non-defense. It requires additional funding through the war-related Overseas Contingency Operations account for both years, as well. It also prevents a sharp increase in Medicare Part B premiums for certain beneficiaries in 2016 and keeps the Social Security disability insurance trust fund solvent until 2022. It includes $79.9 billion in mandatory spending cuts and revenue increases to offset the bill's costs, and would reduce the deficit by $497 million according to the Congressional Budget Office. Yoho voted no. Graham voted yes.

The Senate has one upcoming vote on "Waters of the United States" Definition (S.1140), a bill that would require the Obama administration to revisit its rule updating federal regulation of streams and wetlands. The House has one upcoming vote on Surface Transportation Reauthorization (H.R.22), a bill that would reauthorize funding for various highways and transit programs.

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